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Price Comparison (DFW): Produce & Some Meat, Dairy & Nuts – week of 7/14/10


Cheap Peaches & Nectarines
If you are looking for cheap US-grown peaches and nectarines, today is the last day to get them for $0.47/lb at Newflower Farmers Market. The store is located at 1800 N. Henderson Avenue, north of downtown Dallas. I purchased several pounds of their peaches a few days ago.

They are not nearly as good as the Texas-grown peaches I purchased at Central Market for $1.50/lb, but they’re fine for making peach sorbet and sauces!

Speaking of Texas-grown peaches, the man who did the Williams-Sonoma technique class last weekend raved about Ham Orchard peaches. My daughter and I are planning a trip to Terrell to check it out. I’ll let you know what we find!

Best Price on Organic Fuji Apples
I am only buying organic apples these days, and the prices usually range from $1.99-2.49/lb. I have found that my apple peeler/corer/slicer consistently works the best with Fuji apples and had been paying $2.49/lb for these apples at Whole Foods and Central Market.

Last week, I found that Super Target sells them for $1.99/lb! Target does not have a huge quantity of these apples, and I only found a few that I felt were still worth buying, but given the amount of apples I buy each week, a $0.50/lb savings is huge!

I use the apples to make applesauce (which we eat as is, and also in recipes) and baked apples. I have also started juicing apples since no commercial apple juices are “legal” on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.

Have you heard?
Roy’s Natural Market is closing in early August. The store is located at Preston/Royal in Dallas. From now until July 16, visit the store between 2-4PM to wish Roy a happy retirement, get discounts and register to win prizes.

Now on to the produce comparison document for the week of July 14…

Here’s what I am thinking about buying this week:

Kroger

– Welch’s 100% Grape Juice 64 oz – $1.49 ea (use $1.00/1 printable coupon and must buy 10 participating items in mega sale – I may buy batteries). I printed the coupon last week, so I’m not sure if it is still available.
– Hass Avocados (small) – $0.50 ea

Newflower Farmers Market

– Apricots (US Grown) – $0.88/lb
– Blueberries (US Grown) – $0.88/pint
– Peaches (US Grown – 7/14 only) – $0.47/lb
– Seedless Watermelon – $0.19/lb (they weigh around 10 lbs)
– Celery (Organic) – $0.99 ea
– Chard & Kale (Organic) – $1.50/bunch
– Cashews, unsalted or raw – $4.99/lb
– Yellow Cheddar – $2.99/lb

Sprouts

– Seedless Watermelon – $1.49 ea (if cheaper than Newflower Farmers Market)
– Almonds, unsalted/raw – $4.99/lb

Download the full comparison (PDF format). It covers the DFW-area following stores:

Albertsons
Aldi
Central Market
Fiesta
Kroger
Market Street
Sprouts
Sunflower Market
Tom Thumb
Walmart
Whole Foods

Please let me know if you have any questions!


My Kale Chip Experiment


I mentioned last week that I was making kale chips for the first time after finding some beautiful organic kale at New Flower Market for $1.50/bunch. I thought that was the sale price, but I stopped by New Flower Market this week, and it is still $1.50/bunch!

I have a few different kale chip “recipes” and decided to experiment a bit. The first and third batches were made in the oven and the second batch was made in my Excalibur dehydrator. The ones that I made in the dehydrator were by far the best tasting as I think I overcooked the ones I made in the oven.

For my first attempt, I cooked them at 350 in the oven. I put some directly on the baking sheet and some on aluminum foil. The recipe said to cover the torn leaves in olive oil, so I did. Actually they were “drenched” in olive oil, which I think was mistake #1. Here’s what they looked like:

Mary had seen my post about making kale chips and suggested lightly sprinkling the kale with olive oil (less than a tablespoon) and then cook them at 400 for 10 minutes, watching carefully so as not to over-cook. She also suggested sprinkling them with garlic, red pepper or another desired flavor once they come out of the oven. I plan to try her suggestion since it’s a lot faster to make them in the oven than in the dehydrator!

For the kale chips I made in the dehydrator, I decided to use a brush to apply the olive oil mixture which included a little salt, lemon juice and vinegar.

I didn’t measure the ingredients – just mixed them until they tasted like something I would eat. I love salt & vinegar chips, so I wanted to re-create something that would have a similar flavor.

Once they were coated, I placed them on the dehydrator’s trays and set the temperature to 155 for one hour and then 115 for four hours, as recommended at ComfyTummy.com.

While the kale chips are a far cry from the greasy salt and vinegar chips that I love, they are much healthier and not too bad. I will make them again and will experiment with different coatings.

After I posted this on my blog, Anne tweeted that she has been making Kale chips for a while and loves them. I asked her how she makes them, and she sent me this link at AllRecipes.com. She also mentioned she likes to season them with ranch. If you’ve made kale chips, I’d love to hear how you make them and what you use for seasoning.

Kale was mentioned at the free Williams-Sonoma technique class on Sunday. The person doing the demo mentioned how much he loves kale, chard and banana smoothies, so I decided to try making one that evening with my juicer.

The Williams-Sonoma product demo person mentioned that some juicers can make smoothies and since mine has five settings like the one they used during the class, I thought maybe mine would work. Unfortunately I couldn’t get much juice out of one banana, a bunch of chard and a bunch of kale. But once I added one large apple, I was able to get two glasses of the green-colored juice. My daughter thought it looked “disgusting” just like the Williams-Sonoma guy said he thought when he first saw it, but she loved it. It wasn’t bad at all. I think a Vitamix, Blendtec or similar blender would be better suited for making these smoothies, but for now, the juicer will do.



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